Course Selection Guide

Click here to view the full 2016-2017 Course Selection Guide (PDF)
 
Use the links below to view specific subjects within the Course Selection Guide 
 
 
 
 
 

ENGLISH

 

Beginning with the class of 2017, students who did not reach proficiency on the Keystone Literature exam will be required to take the Keystone Literature Review course. To graduate, the student must either gain proficiency on the Keystone exam in the appropriate subject, or gain proficiency through a Project Based Assessment, or master the requirements as outlined in the student’s IEP if appropriate. 

 

ENGLISH 9- 1 credit

Instructor: Casey Hackett

Course Description:
This course is an introduction to high school English. This year will focus on three main components of study which include critical reading strategies, literary exploration and interpretation as well as literary analysis through academic composition. Students should expect in-depth writing assignments that will focus on comprehension, meaning and interpretation. We will also focus on improving basic writing skills such as grammar, composition, research, revision, and vocabulary usage.  The course will include the study of different literary genres and time periods. Literature that will be studied within the course includes, but is not limited to: To Kill a Mockingbird, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and Night. The students will also study Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet as an introduction to drama. Vocabulary and the accelerated reading program are also integral parts of this course as well. This course is designed to prepare students to perform at a proficient or advanced level for the Literature Keystone Exam which will be administered in 10th grade English.

The Pennsylvania Common Core Standards form the basis for this course.

 

ENGLISH HONORS 9- 1 credit

Instructor: Casey Hackett

Pre-requisites:

            * Students must have a GPA of 90% or better.

            * Students must have the recommendation of their English teacher.

Course Description:
This course is an introduction to high school English. Unlike the college prep and applied English courses, we will work at an accelerated pace and work at a more in-depth level with the literature that we study.  The year will be focused on three main components of study which include critical reading strategies, literary exploration and interpretation as well as literary analysis through academic composition. Students should expect in-depth writing assignments that will focus on comprehension, meaning and interpretation. We will also focus on improving basic writing skills such grammar, composition, research, revision, and vocabulary usage.  The course will include the study of different literary genres and time periods. The novels studied include, but are not limited to: To Kill a Mockingbird (required summer reading project), Lord of the Flies and Night. The students will also study Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet as an introduction to drama. Vocabulary and the accelerated reading program are also integral parts of this course as well. This course is designed to prepare students to perform at a proficient or advanced level for the Literature Keystone Exam which will be taken at the end of the 9th grade school year.

The Pennsylvania Common Core Standards form the basis for this course.

 

ENGLISH 10- 1 credit

Instructor: Casey Hackett

Course Description:
This is a course that will build on the skills previously introduced in 9th grade English. We will explore and discuss a variety of literature including short story, drama, fiction and nonfiction. We will continue to further develop literary interpretation, responding to literature and making textual connections to other pieces of literature as well as connections to our own life experiences. Students will also continue to advance their academic writing skills, grammar and vocabulary through the development of a research paper.  A few of novels that will be studied in 10th grade may include, but is not limited to: Fahrenheit 451, Lord of the Flies, and Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass. The students will also study Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar as part of our drama unit. The accelerated reading program is an integral part of this course and needs to be completed.  This course is designed to prepare students to perform at a proficient or advanced level for the Literature Keystone Exam which will be administered in the end of the 10th grade school year.

The Pennsylvania Common Core Standards form the basis for this course.

 

ENGLISH 10 HONORS- 1 credit

Instructor: Casey Hackett

Pre-requisites-

            * Students must have a GPA of 90% or better.

            * Students must have the recommendation of their English teacher.

Course Objectives:
This is a course that will build on the skills previously introduced in 9th grade English. Unlike the college prep and applied courses, we will move at an accelerated pace work at a more in-depth level with the literature that we study. We will explore short story, poetry, drama, fiction and nonfiction. We will continue to develop interpretation, responding and the ability to make textual connections to other pieces of literary works as well as connections to our own life experiences. Students will also continue to develop their writing skills, grammar and vocabulary. Some of the literary works to be studied may include, but are not limited to: Fahrenheit 451 (Required summer reading project), The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Invisible Man, and the Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass. The students will also study Shakespeare’s Othello as part of the drama unit. The accelerated reading program is an integral part of this course as well and needs to be completed.

The Pennsylvania Common Core Standards form the basis for this course.

 

KEYSTONE LITERATURE REVIEW COURSE -0.5 credit

Students who do not achieve proficiency on the Keystone Literature Exam will be enrolled in the Keystone Literature course and will be required to take PDE’s re-test. This course is graded on a pass / fail basis. 

 

ENGLISH 11- 1 credit

Instructor: Melissa Chivers

Course Description:
This course focuses on basic reading and comprehension skills needed to ensure students’ success in the work force.  Like other 11th grade English courses, an emphasis will be placed on American literature to help students gain some exposure to these genres.  Basic writing and vocabulary skills will be stressed.

 

AMERICAN LITERATURE 11- 1 credit

Instructor: Melissa Chivers

Course Description:
This course will provide students with a comprehensive knowledge of the language arts including the reading and interpretation of literature, grammar skills, and writing skills to ensure the successful entrance into a college setting.  A special focus will be placed upon American literature including Nathaniel Hawthorne, Walt Whitman, and Edgar Allan Poe.  Vocabulary for the successful completion of College Board examinations will also be emphasized along with the preparation of students for college level writing.

 

AMERICAN LITERATURE 11 HONORS- 1.5 credits

Instructor: Melissa Chivers

  Prerequisites:

•           Students must have a GPA of 90% or better.

•           Students must have the recommendation of their English teacher.

Course Description:
Students enrolling in this class should have the major goal of working towards college and/or taking AP English as a senior.  This class involves somewhat difficult, in-depth reading and writing.  It includes a wide variety of American literature including but not necessarily limited to Nathaniel Hawthorne, Benjamin Franklin, Edgar Allan Poe, Walt Whitman, and William Faulkner.  Novel requirements are as follows: The Scarlet Letter, Beloved, Native Son, and The Things They Carried.   The instructor will expect students in this course to complete a variety of college style literary analyses, projects (including extensive summer requirements), and independent reading assignments.

 

ENGLISH 12- 1 credit

Instructor: Melissa Chivers

Course Description:
This course focuses on basic reading and comprehension skills needed to ensure students’ success in the work force.  Like other 12th grade English courses an emphasis will be placed on the classics of British and world literature to help students gain some exposure to these genres.  Basic writing and vocabulary skills will be stressed.

 

BRITISH AND WORLD LITERATURE 12- 1 credit

Instructor: Melissa Chivers

Course Description:
This course will provide students with a comprehensive knowledge of the language arts including the reading and interpretation of literature, grammar skills, and writing skills to ensure the successful entrance into a college setting.  A special focus will be placed upon British literature including such classics as William Shakespeare, Charles Dickens, and Aldous Huxley.  Vocabulary for the successful completion of College Board examinations will also be emphasized along with the preparation of students for college level writing. 

 

AP ENGLISH LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION-12th grade- 1.5 credit

Instructor: Melissa Chivers

Students enrolled in this course will be required to take the College Board’s AP English Literature and Composition exam.

Prerequisites:

·         Students must have a GPA of 90% or better.

·         Students must have the recommendation of their English teacher.

Course Description:
Students enrolling in this class should have the major goal of working to take and successfully complete the AP level exam in hope of earning college credit.  This class involves much difficult, in-depth reading and writing along with extensive vocabulary requirements pertaining to both general language and literature studies.  It includes a wide variety of literature from a diverse collection of times and places including but not necessarily limited to ancient Greece, Renaissance and Victorian England, twentieth century Ireland, along with some more modern day and a few American pieces as well.  Truly learning from this experience will require both a desire to think and an open mind.   The instructor will expect students in this course to complete a variety of college style literary analyses, projects (including extensive summer requirements), and independent reading assignments.
 
 

SAT PREP COURSE- 10th-12th .50 credit

The PSAT/SAT Prep course is designed to help students prepare for the rigors of taking the PSAT and/or SAT tests offered by the College Board.  Our primary goal is to identify and implement test taking strategies using prerequisite knowledge to increase student performance.  This course will focus on the Verbal Component of the SAT.

 

 

SOCIAL STUDIES

 

CIVICS 9: 1 credit

Prerequisite: Completion of 8th Grade World History I

Purpose/Content:
Civics is designed to give students the skills and knowledge necessary to become responsible and effective citizens in an interdependent world.  Students will focus on the structure of our legal and political systems which serve as the foundation of our government.  An analysis of the free-enterprise system coupled with interpreting foreign and domestic policies will also contribute to their understanding.

 

HONORS CIVICS  9: 1 credit

Purpose/Content:
Civics is designed to give students the skills and knowledge necessary to become responsible and effective citizens in an interdependent world.  Students will focus on the structure of our legal and political systems which serve as the foundation of our government.  An analysis of the free-enterprise system coupled with interpreting foreign and domestic policies will also contribute to their understanding.  Students will be required to implement CFF technology, develop research papers, and develop community projects as part of this honors curriculum. 
 
 

AMERICAN HISTORY II : Industrial Revolution to Present Day 10: 1 cr.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of 9th grade Civics.

Purpose:
To have students demonstrate their understanding of American history in measurable terms through in-depth analysis of individuals and groups, conflict and cooperation, continuity and change, and historical evidence while targeting specific standards.
 
Content:
This survey course is designed to provide students with a foundation in late 19th and 20th century American history. Students will examine the political, economic, cultural, and social evolution of America from the period of Civil War to World War II. Various themes will be examined including but not limited to industrialization, immigration, military conflicts, diplomacy, politics, and social reform. Students will be expected to complete a variety of projects, writing assignments, and presentations related to the various themes being examined during the course of the year.

 

HONORS AMERICAN HISTORY II: 10:  1 credit

Content:
This course is designed to establish a firm comprehension of the historical topics and concepts that have shaped the United States from the Industrial Revolution to the present day.  The course will provide explanations, theories, and background information necessary to understand the current status of the United States.  Students will be required to implement CFF technology, develop research papers, and complete a Living History final exam as part of the honors curriculum. 

 

GENERAL WORLD HISTORY II:  11: 1 credit

Prerequisite: Successful completion of tenth grade course offering

Purpose/Content:
This course is designed to present to students historical events, and documents that helped shape the cultural, ideological, and political characteristics of our world from the Renaissance period to the present.  Students who take this course will not be subjected to college level standards, but will attain general principles related to the development of nations around the world.

 

COLLEGE PREP WORLD HISTORY II: 11: 1 credit

Prerequisite: Successful completion of tenth grade course offering

Purpose/Content:
This course is designed to present to students historical events and documents that helped shape the cultural, ideological, and political characteristics of our world from the Renaissance period to the present.  Students who take this course will be subjected to college level standards related to analytic thinking, public speaking and research.  Students will complete various projects and activities where analysis and synthesis are incorporated.

 

HONORS WORLD HISTORY II:  11: 1 credit

Prerequisite: Successful completion of tenth grade course offering

Purpose/Content:
This course is designed to present to students historical events and documents that helped shape the cultural, ideological, and political characteristics of our world from the Renaissance period to the present.  Students who take this course will be subjected to college level standards related to analytic thinking, public speaking and research.  Additional research papers, analytical essays, current events assignments, and projects will be evident during this course.

 

GENERAL AMERICAN GOVERNMENT/ECONOMICS – 12: 1 credit

Prerequisite: Successful completion of 11th grade World History II

Purpose/Content:
This course is designed to provide students with the fundamental principles and practices of American Government. The course is divided into two units.  In American Government, students will study topics and documents necessary for becoming active participants in American democracy.  Fundamental principles addressed will include federalism, The Bill of Rights, separation of powers, checks and balances, and the Constitution.  Organizations like the media, political parties, and interests groups that impact the American government will also be addressed.   In Economics, students will study principles involved in the production, consumption, and exchange of goods and services.  Topics addressed during this portion of the course include factor markets, product markets, business cycles, demand, supply, and financial intermediaries.   Students who are not planning to go to college, but who wish to understand the basic principles of the American government and Economics are recommended for this course.

 

COLLEGE PREP AMERICAN GOVERNMENT/ECONOMICS – 12: 1 credit

Prerequisite: Successful completion of 11th grade World History II

Purpose/Content:
The course is designed to provide students with the fundamental principles and practices of American Government. The course is divided into two units.  In American Government student s will study topics and documents necessary for becoming active participants in American democracy.  Fundamental principles addressed will include federalism, The Bill of Rights, separation of powers, checks and balances, and the Constitution.  Organizations like the media, political parties, and interests groups that impact the American government will also be addressed.   In Economics, students will study principles involved in the production, consumption, and exchange of goods and services.  Topics addressed during this portion of the course include factor markets, product markets, business cycles, demand, supply, and financial intermediaries.  College level standards through research-based projects that include analytic thinking, public speaking and research papers will be evident throughout this course.  Students who are planning to go to college, but who do not wish to take the Advanced Placement Government class or Honors class are recommended for this course.

 

AP AMERICAN GOVERNMENT/POLITICS- Senior- 1.5 credit

Students enrolled in this course will be required to take the College Board’s AP Government exam.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of 11th grade Honors World History II with a 93% GPA or above.  Teacher recommendation required.

Purpose:
This course is designed to help the college-bound student who intends to take the Advance Placement examination during their senior year.
 
Content:
This course gives students an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States.  This course includes both the study of general concepts used to interpret U.S. government and politics and the analysis of specific examples.  It requires familiarity with various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute U.S. government and politics.  Students will be taught to understand typical patterns of political processes and behavior and their consequences.  In addition students will be taught how to analyze and interpret basic data relevant to U.S. government and politics.  Throughout the course, students will learn to create conclusions through deductive reasoning, analysis, synthesis, and essay development. 

 

PSYCHOLOGY/SOCIOLOGY – Juniors/Seniors - 1 cr.

Prerequisite: None

Purpose:
This course is designed to expose students to the fundamental theories and principles of psychology and sociology.
 
Content:
This course is divided into two units. In Psychology, students will study topics such as problem solving techniques, perception and learning, and the hereditary and environmental factors that shape who we are as individuals. In Sociology, students will study topics such as group development, values, social stratification and status, and communication.

 

U.S. CONTEMPORARY AND WORLD ISSUES: Grades 9-12 (.50 Credit)

Prerequisite: Completion of 9th grade Civics or 9th Grade American History

Purpose/Content:
This course will address contemporary problems and issues at both national and international levels.  The course is developed to increase student awareness of the contemporary conflicts that face the world.  Students will apply primary and secondary materials and develop solutions to various conflicts. On an international level, topics will include the impact violence has on societies, cultural issues that face various nations, military conflicts, gender abuses, and poverty.  On a national level, topics will include the death penalty, physician assisted suicide, the right of the accused, government intervention in the economy, illegal immigration, and the impact social networking has had on society.  This course is designed to increase student interest in contemporary problems and issues. Students will be encouraged to use primary and secondary materials to form opinions and propose solutions to problems.  
 

 

FOREIGN LANGUAGE

 

FOREIGN LANGUAGE I – 1 cr.

SPANISH

Prerequisite: It is required that a student receive a passing grade in the 8th grade Conversational Spanish course and that he/she receives the recommendation of the teacher.

Purpose:
To begin a study of Spanish for any interested student in the ninth grade, or for any student wishing to satisfy a requirement for college acceptance. This course will provide the student with the opportunity to attain an acceptable level of proficiency in the four skill areas of reading, writing, speaking and listening.
 
Content:
The focus of this course is on communication and self-expression relevant to students’ daily lives, needs and interests. The course will include the study of beginning level grammar, useful vocabulary and correct spelling and pronunciation of Spanish. It will also include an overview of cultural similarities and differences.

 

FRENCH

Prerequisite: It is required that a student pass the 8th grade Conversational French class and that he/she receives the recommendation of the teacher.

Purpose:
To begin a study of the French language for any interested student or any student wishing to satisfy a college language requirement. Also, the student should attain an acceptable degree of proficiency in the four skill areas of speaking, reading, listening and writing.
 
Content:
The focus of this course is on communication and self expression relevant to the students’ daily lives, needs, and interests. This course will include the study of beginning level grammar, useful vocabulary and correct pronunciation in the target language. It will also include an overview of cultural similarities and differences.

 

FOREIGN LANGUAGE II - 1 cr.

SPANISH

Prerequisite: It is required that a student receive a passing grade in Spanish I and that he/she also receive the recommendation of the teacher.

Purpose:
To continue the development of the four skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing in Spanish, incorporating higher level grammatical structures, more complex sentence structures and advanced vocabulary.
 
Content:
This course continues to stress the skills of speaking and listening, however increased time is spent on reading comprehension and writing. Writing and performing dialogues and skits based on real life topics will demonstrate both the ability to process and provide information.

 

FRENCH

Prerequisite: It is required that a student pass French I.

Purpose:
To continue and broaden the study of French including higher level grammatical structures, sentence structures and advanced vocabulary.
 
Content:
This course continues the study of grammar and vocabulary through speaking and listening activities, but increased time is spent on reading and writing in French. Additional cultural activities are also integrated.

 

FOREIGN LANGUAGE III  - 1 cr.

SPANISH

Prerequisite: It is required that the student receive a grade of at least an 80% in Spanish II and the recommendation of the teacher.

Purpose:
Students will improve and advance in communication skills of the Spanish language. At this level, students will build on previously learned patterns of both written and spoken Spanish, and they will begin to incorporate more complex structures and patterns.
 
Content:
This course continues to review and incorporate the concepts learned in Spanish I and II. Through various classroom activities, students will demonstrate their ability to initiate and/or respond to basic communicative tasks. Writing of simple compositions and reading of simple essays and short stories will also develop communication skills. In addition, daily conversations in Spanish will occur among students and teacher. A more in-depth look at Spanish history and its culture will also be included, as well as an in-depth study of a Spanish artist.

 

FRENCH

Prerequisite: It is required that a student have at least an 80% in French II and the recommendation of the teacher.

Purpose:
The students will continue to expand their ability to communicate in French at a more complex level. At the same time, students will improve their writing and reading skills with a cultural focus on the contemporary French-speaking world.
 
Content:
This course reviews basic concepts learned in French I and II. Through various classroom activities and projects, the students will be able to apply both their previously acquired and newfound knowledge of the French language. In addition, to improve communication skills, the students will be expected to read and write more in the French language, Finally, French and Francophone culture will be explored in greater depth.

 

FOREIGN LANGUAGE IV  - 1 cr.

SPANISH

Prerequisite: It is required that students receive a grade of at least an 80% in Spanish III.

Purpose:
To increase the student’s level of proficiency in speaking and writing, to advance their level of reading comprehension and to further refine their listening skills.
 
Content:
This course will provide students with opportunities to refine their abilities to communicate in Spanish. A strong emphasis will be placed on listening and speaking. A variety of resources will be used to give the students real world practice with the language. This course will also teach a variety of cultural aspects, provide an in depth study of grammatical concepts, reading of a Spanish novel and an in-depth study of a Spanish artist. Daily speaking is required.

 

FRENCH

Prerequisite: It is required that a student have at least an 80% in French III and the recommendation of the teacher.

Purpose:
To improve the students’ abilities in all four skill areas of listening, speaking, reading and writing.
 
Content:
This course reviews and teaches cultural aspects such as literature, the arts, and French/Francophone daily life along with the study of more complex grammar and vocabulary using outside materials such as the Internet, books, magazines and videos to perfect their knowledge of French. The conclusion of this course will be reading the French children’s novel LePetit Prince, by Antone de Saint-Exupery.
 

 

MATH

 

Beginning with the class of 2017, students who did not reach proficiency on the Keystone Algebra I exam will be required to take the Keystone Algebra Review course. To graduate, the student must either gain proficiency on the Keystone exam in the appropriate subject, or gain proficiency through a Project Based Assessment, or master the requirements as outlined in the student’s IEP if appropriate.

 

ALGEBRA I- 1.5 credit

Applied Algebra I will give students a basic foundation of algebraic concepts.  This course will cover most of the material taught in Academic Algebra I but will be presented at a slower pace with more class time and hands-on activities.  This course will focus on the study of variables and linear equations.  Graphing techniques, abstract reasoning skills, and problem solving skills are developed and applied to real life situations.  While similar algebra skills are covered, the material is paced to permit for mastery of content and further skill development.  Topics include: the language of Algebra, real numbers, solving linear equations, graphing relations and functions, analyzing linear equations, solving linear inequalities, systems of equations and inequalities, and statistics. 

 

ALGEBRA I –  1 cr.

Purpose:
To establish a sound foundation for continued movements through further academic mathematics courses.  Algebra I is essential for any student planning to further her/his education beyond high school. 
 
Content:
In this course, concepts of arithmetic basic to understanding Algebra is solidified.  This course is a detailed study of sign rules, properties, evaluating, simplifying, and solving all types of equations and applications to word problems.

This course is designed to prepare students to perform at a proficient or advanced level for the Algebra Keystone Exam which will be administered in the end of the course.

 

ALGEBRA II- 1.5 credits

This course makes regular use of the graphing calculator to make technology an integral part of the problem solving process.  While similar Algebra skills are covered, the material is paced to permit for mastery of content and further skill development.  Topics include radical expressions, quadratic functions and inequalities, polynomial functions, rational expressions and equations, exponential and logarithmic relations.  Applied Algebra II is designed to prepare students to perform at a proficient or advanced level for the Algebra  Keystone Exam which will be administered in the end of the course.

 

KEYSTONE ALGEBRA REVIEW- .50 credit

Students who scored at a basic or below basic level on their Keystone Math test will be required to take this course. The class will focus on remediation materials designed to meet the state's academic standards in preparation for the Keystone re-test and/or the project-based assessment.

 

ALGEBRA II-   - 1 cr.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra I and Geometry.

Purpose:
To extend the topics from Algebra I.
 
Content:
This course is an extensive investigation of solving equations and inequalities involving one and two variables; simplifying rational algebraic expressions; expressions with irrational and complex numbers; and dividing polynomials.  This course describes in detail the elements of geometry by using sets; it develops inductive reasoning and applies it to the topics of perpendicular and parallel lines and planes; it includes a study of polygons (particularly triangles) with emphasis on congruency and similarity.

 

HONORS ALGEBRA II- 1 credit

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra I.   A score of Proficient or Advanced on the Algebra I Keystone exam. 

Purpose:
To extend the topics from Algebra I.
 
Content:
This course is an extensive investigation of solving equations and inequalities involving one and two variables; simplifying rational algebraic expressions; expressions with irrational and complex numbers; and dividing polynomials.  This course describes in detail the elements of geometry by using sets; it develops inductive reasoning and applies it to the topics of perpendicular and parallel lines and planes; it includes a study of polygons (particularly triangles) with emphasis on congruency and similarity.

 

GEOMETRY –  1 cr.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra I

Purpose:
To develop and strengthen geometric skills through visual conception, logical deduction or discovery. Gaining an appreciation of geometry through the powers of observation is a continuous theme of this course.
 
Content:
An introduction to deductive and inductive reasoning is stressed and applied through such concepts as parallel and perpendicular lines, triangles and quadrilaterals. This course will also discover and apply theories such as the Pythagorean Theorem to real-life problem solving.

 

HONORS GEOMETRY –  1 cr.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Honors Algebra I and Honors Algebra II

Purpose:
To develop and strengthen geometric skills through visual conception, logical deduction or discovery. Gaining an appreciation of geometry through the powers of observation is a continuous theme of this course.
 
Content:
An introduction to deductive and inductive reasoning is stressed and applied through such concepts as parallel and perpendicular lines, triangles and quadrilaterals. This course will also discover and apply theories such as the Pythagorean Theorem to real-life problem solving.  This class will investigate Basic Trigonometry, circles, area and volume. 

 

HONORS TRIGONOMETRY – .50 credit

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Honors Algebra I, Honors Geometry, and Honors Algebra II.

Content:
This course is the study of right triangle measurements and ratios, useful for calculating indirect measurements. Topics covered in Trigonometry include: nonlinear functions, right triangle properties, trigonometric functions, the unit circle, radian measure, trigonometric identities, trigonometric graphs, and advanced algebra.

 

HONORS PRE-CALCULUS- .50 credit

Prerequisite: Honors Algebra I, Honors Algebra II, Honors Geometry

This course is designed to continue, maintain, sharpen and improve mathematical skills attained through Algebra II/Trigonometry (H). It also extends many of the topics in more depth than covered in previous math courses and prepares students for a formal course in Calculus. The course will extend work with complex numbers, expand understanding of logarithms and exponential functions, use characteristics of polynomial and rational functions to sketch graphs of those functions, and perform operations with vectors.

 

TRIGONOMETRY – .50 credit

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II.

Content:
This course is the study of right triangle measurements and ratios, useful for calculating indirect measurements. Topics covered in Trigonometry include: nonlinear functions, right triangle properties, trigonometric functions, the unit circle, radian measure, trigonometric identities, trigonometric graphs, and advanced algebra.

 

PRE-CALCULUS-.50 credit

Prerequisite: Algebra I, Algebra II, Geometry

This course is designed to continue, maintain, sharpen and improve mathematical skills attained through Algebra II/Trigonometry (H). It also extends many of the topics in more depth than covered in previous math courses and prepares students for a formal course in Calculus. The course will extend work with complex numbers, expand understanding of logarithms and exponential functions, use characteristics of polynomial and rational functions to sketch graphs of those functions, and perform operations with vectors.

 

AP CALCULUS- 1.5 credit

Students enrolled in this course will be required to take the College Board’s AP Calculus exam.

Prerequisite:  Advanced Math Grade of A

Advanced Placement Calculus is a course that requires a student to learn the fundamental concepts and mathematics of calculus and to recognize and formulate connections between topics.  It is expected from this course that students will gain mathematical skill, understanding and use of technology to help them be successful in further mathematics classes and in their future careers.  Students are expected to think hard, try different approaches to problems, and enjoy seeing their understanding of mathematics grow. The course moves at an accelerated speed.

 

CALCULUS-12th grade- 1 cr.

This course requires a student to learn the fundamental concepts and mathematics of calculus and to recognize and formulate connections between topics.  It is expected from this course that students will gain mathematical skill, understanding and use of technology to help them be successful in further mathematics classes and in their future careers. 

 

COLLEGE MATH -Seniors - 1 cr.

The goal of this course will be to provide mathematics to students who seek a course that strengthens their knowledge in algebra and geometry.  It will also contain areas of mathematics such as sets, logic, number theory, and probability and statistics.  This course is recommended for students who are planning on going to a college, university, or technical/trade school, but are not majoring in the math, medical or science field.

 

PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS – .50 credit

Pre-requisite: Successful completion of Algebra I

This course is geared toward students who have completed at least Algebra I. The statistical applications are drawn from various disciplines, including natural sciences, social sciences, business, economics, education, engineering, and computer science.  A TI-83 or higher graphing calculator is required.

 

SAT PREP COURSE- 10th-12th .50 credit

 

The PSAT/SAT Prep course is designed to help students prepare for the rigors of taking the PSAT and/or SAT tests offered by the College Board.  Our primary goal is to identify and implement test taking strategies using prerequisite knowledge to increase student performance.  Students in this course should have passed Algebra 2 or are taking it concurrently.  

 

 

SCIENCE

 

Beginning with the class of 2017, students who did not reach proficiency on the Keystone Biology exam will be required to take the Keystone Biology Review course. To graduate, the student must either gain proficiency on the Keystone exam in the appropriate subject, or gain proficiency through a Project Based Assessment, or master the requirements as outlined in the student’s IEP if appropriate.

 

HONORS BIOLOGY I- Freshman- 1.5 credits

Content:
Taught on an honors level, this course provides an overview of important ecological concepts and their integration into the Biology curriculum.  Topics covered include ecological relationships and changes, evolution of species, genetic theory, and the relationship between structure and function at all levels of organization among living things. 

 

FOUNDATIONS OF BIOLOGY I (1 credit) – 9th Grade Course

Biology I is a 9th grade science course that will deal with biology as an everyday experience.  Topics covered include the nature of Biology, properties of water, and principles of Ecology, cell Biology, Evolution and classification.  Lab experiments combined with demonstrations, and multiple learning activities will be utilized throughout the year.  Relevant issues in Biology along with web-based activities will be integrated as needed.   The course content is aligned with the assessment anchors for the Keystone Exam for Biology. This course is designed to provide a strong background in major biological concepts to prepare you for taking the Biology Keystone Exam next year. (Following completion of Foundations of Biology II)

 

FOUNDATIONS OF BIOLOGY II (1 credit) – 10th Grade Course  

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of Foundations of Biology I

Biology is the second course in a two course sequence designed to help prepare students for the Biology Keystone Exam.  This course will complete our study of the Assessment Anchors for the Biology Keystone Exam.  The Assessment Anchors are defined by the Eligible Content statements established by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. The course will begin with an intensive review of concepts covered in Foundations I followed by a continuation of the following assessment anchors:  The Chemical Basis of Life, Bioenergetics, Cell Growth and Reproduction, and Genetics.  A significant laboratory component will be incorporated into the course to support the major concepts studied in class.  Students will take the Biology Keystone Exam at the conclusion of this course.

 

KEYSTONE BIOLOGY REMEDIATION COURSE -0.5 credit

This pass/fail course is intended for students who did not earn a proficient or advanced score on the Biology Keystone Exam.  The course will review all of the 4 anchors covered in the Biology Keystone Exam module one (Cells and Cell Processes), and module two (Continuity and the Unity of Life).  Resources will include a Biology Keystone Booklet, Study Island, and an on-line PA Biology Keystone preparation site.  Upon completion of the course, all students will retake the Biology Keystone Exam.

 

CHEMISTRY I -10th-11th grade- 1 credit

Prerequisite: Successful completion of the Biology Keystone

Purpose:
To provide the college preparatory student with a fundamental knowledge of the theory and applications of modern chemistry.
 
Content:
This course includes chemical/physical changes, atomic structure, periodic table, chemical bonding, systematic nomenclature, chemical equations/reactions, stoichiometry, and gases.  This course also provides laboratory experience in the topics covered. 

 

CHEMISTRY I (H)-10th-11th grade- 1.5 credit

Prerequisite: Biology I and successful completion of the Biology Keystone

This course will be taught on an honors level.  It is intended for students planning to major in a scientific field in college.  This course includes all topics in Chemistry I in addition to pH, qualitative analysis, and acids/bases.  This course also provides laboratory experience in the topic covered along with completion of a laboratory notebook. 

 

INDUSTRIAL CHEMISTRY- 11: 1 cr.

Prerequisite: Biology I

Purpose:
This course is intended to provide the student with a fundamental understanding of the chemistry used in industrial processes. The course includes most of the theory of general chemistry but with less emphasis on the abstract and chemical calculations. Greater emphasis is placed on descriptive chemistry and the practical application on chemicals in modern industry. This course is offered as an alternative to college preparatory students who are not planning to pursue a career in science, or whose level of math proficiency may cause them difficulty with chemistry.
 
Content:
This course examines the science and engineering which is central to American industry. Topics will include agriculture, chemicals, electronics, energy production, metallurgy, mining, textiles, and timber. Emphasis is on actual industrial processes and techniques rather than abstract theory. The course includes a limited amount of laboratory work, primarily in product testing.

 

CHEMISTRY II (H)- 11th-12th grade- 1 credit

This course includes organic chemistry, thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, oxidation-reduction, solubility equilibrium, electro-chemistry, and nuclear chemistry.  This course also provides laboratory experience in applicable topics covered. 

 

AP CHEMISTRY- 11th-12th grade- 1.5 credit

Students enrolled in this course will be required to take the College Board’s AP Chemistry exam. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry I, Algebra II, and teacher recommendation

Content:
This course is designed as an entry-level college chemistry course.  Topics covered include gases, equations, stoichiometry, organic chemistry, nuclear chemistry, coordination chemistry, calculus-based calculations, thermodynamics, kinetics, and laboratories.  Students taking this course should have a solid background in basic chemistry and algebra and should be highly motivated.  Students are required to take the AP Chemistry Exam at the end of the course. 

 

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE 11th-12th grade - 1 cr.

Content:
This course will follow the newly adopted State Standards in Environmental Science.  The content will include studies of local, national, and world problems associated with the environment.  It will reinforce basic concepts in relationships between living things and their surroundings with a special emphasis on the animals and plants that live in the Benton area.  Some studies will focus on the Fishing Creek Watershed and surrounding forests.  The course will encourage the student to accept a responsible role in maintaining our environment.  
 

PHYSICS- 11th-12th grade- 1 credit

Prerequisite: Chemistry I and Advanced Math (may be taken concurrently with teacher recommendation)

Content:
This course includes kinematics, Newton’s Law, statics, momentum, energy, pressure, and torque.  The focus will be understanding concepts of physics, but math applications will also be explored. 

 

EARTH AND SPACE SCIENCE – 11th-12th grade - 1 cr.

Prerequisite: Chemistry I or Industrial Chemistry

Content:
The course provides an introduction to the study of composition, structure, and process of the earth, its geologic history, and its place in the universe.  The four major branches of earth science are studied and include geology, meteorology, oceanography, and astronomy.

 

AP BIOLOGY- Seniors- 1.5 credit

Students enrolled in this course will be required to take the College Board’s AP Biology exam.

AP Biology is a senior only, college-level course for highly motivated students who plan to further their education in a scientific field.  The course is designed to be the equivalent of a two-semester college introductory biology course.  The goal of the course is to provide students with the conceptual framework, factual knowledge, and analytical skills to deal critically with the rapid changing science of biology.  A significant laboratory component will be integrated into the curriculum.  The class differs from Honors Advanced Biology with respect to the range and depth of topics covered, the kind of laboratory work done, and the time and effort required of students.  Due to the volume of material to be covered, students will be expected to assume responsibility for their own learning by completing several assignments during the summer. 

 

ADVANCED BIOLOGY- Seniors – 1 cr.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Biology I, Biology II and Chemistry I

Purpose:
This course is designed to provide college bound students with an adequate background to successfully complete the introductory college biology course. It is strongly recommended for all high school seniors that are anticipating a career in the biological sciences and medical fields.
 
Content:
This course includes an in-depth study of human anatomy and physiology, as well as a look into molecular and human genetics. There is an in-depth unit on DNA/RNA and molecular genetics and human genetics, and also class projects involving the dissection of a rat and an insect collection. The ultimate goal of this course is to help prepare the student for college and a possible future career in a biological science related field.
 
 

ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY-12th grade- 1 credit

This course is designed to be an advances study of the human body for students with an interest in pursuing a career in a health-related field.  Topics include anatomical structures, physiological systems, and body functions.  Students will acquire skills used in the classification of data, experience in oral and written communication of data, and skills in drawing logical inferences and predicting outcomes.  Students will apply the principle of physiology to human health and well-being and evaluate the applications and career implications of physiology and anatomy principles. 

 

SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY-11th-12th grade- 1 credit

Prerequisite: Chemistry I

Content:
This course explains the physical universe in terms of basic interactions and simple particles.  The focus will be understanding concepts of physical science conceptually and mathematically.  Topics to be covered include motion, Newton’s Law, energy, electricity, and properties of matter.  
 

 

BUSINESS AND TECHNOLOGY

 

COMPUTER APPLICATIONSFreshmen - 1 cr.

Prerequisite: None.

Purpose:
To develop skills in various computer application programs.
 
Content:
This course covers: MS Office – Word, Access, Excel, and Power Point, other MS Office programs will be introduced if time allows.

 

DESKTOP PUBLISHING/DIGITAL GRAPHICS/WEB PAGE DESIGN – Sophomores – Seniors – .50 cr.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of 9th grade Computer Applications.

Purpose:
Introduce students to desktop publishing, working with graphics, and creating web pages.
 
Content:
Using desktop publishing and graphics software, students will learn how to create effective and interesting documents and publications. Students will learn the principles and execution of page layout graphics, and production, as well as digital photography and photo editing. Using Microsoft Word, Microsoft Publisher, and Adobe Photoshop, students will implement design principles in the creation of a variety of documents including certificates, flyers, brochures, newsletters, and web pages.

 

ACCOUNTING I- 10th – 12th grade - 1 cr.

Prerequisite: None

Purpose:
To provide basic theory in accounting for practical use.
 
Content:
The course begins with the basics of accounting and covers the total financial period including all steps in the accounting cycle: opening, recording entries, posting, and closing entries. Completing financial reports, such as the balance sheet and the income statement for single proprietorship and partnership, is an integral part of the course. Accounting is the backbone of any business structure and is highly recommended for any student considering a career in the business field.

 

ACCOUNTING II -11th and 12th grade - 1 cr.

Prerequisite: 80% or better in Accounting I

Purpose:
This course prepares students for employment in business or for college in the fields of Accounting, Business Management or Administration, and Business Education.
 
Content:
The course will begin with a review of basic procedures of accounting. The student will study the purpose as well as the method of each structure including department accounting, bad debts, depreciation, prepaid and accrued income and expenses, taxes, notes and drafts, corporate accounting, and automated accounting. Students will spend the second semester learning about computerized accounting and accounting spreadsheet applications using a hands-on approach. Students will learn to operate the software by entering realistic accounting transactions for a variety of business applications and by generating financial statements, spreadsheets, and various financial reports.

 

PERSONAL FINANCE: 11th and 12th grade-   .50 credit

This course is designed to introduce students to various personal finance and practical life skills that are required to be a competent, successful consumer. This course will provide students the opportunity to learn money management, understand payroll, benefits, and filing income tax returns. Credit management topics include: what is credit, types and sources of credit, establishing good credit, and using credit responsibly. Financial security topics include: saving for the future, investing in stocks, buying a home, and the mortgage process. Other important topics include: buying a vehicle, automobile insurance, property and liability insurance, and health and life insurance.

 

ADVANCED COMPUTER APPLICATIONS- 11th and 12th grade- .50 credit

Prerequisite: Successful completion of 9th grade Computer Applications

This course is designed to provide students with a strong working knowledge of print design and publishing. Students will gain skills in one or more of the following areas: page design, advanced publishing techniques, copy writing, editing and photography while producing a creative, innovative yearbook which records school memories and events. This class is great for the student interested in advertising, journalism, marketing, web design, and desktop publishing. The software applications that will be used include Adobe PhotoShop and InDesign. Scanners, digital cameras, and color printers will be used in this course.

 

 

FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCE

 

FOODS I – Freshman to Seniors- 1 credit

Prerequisite: None

Purpose:
Students will learn to develop basic culinary skills, learn kitchen safety and sanitary procedures; understand kitchen math and learn basic food science.
 
Content:
Units include basic cooking skills, food preparation, safety and sanitation practices, nutritional studies and management skills.

 

FOODS II- Sophomores - Seniors - 1 cr.

Prerequisite: Foods I

Purpose:
Student will improve their basic culinary skills, achieve a deeper understanding of Food Science and create nutritionally healthy snacks and meals.
 
Content:
Units include advanced cooking, food science, focusing on meal management, calories and nutritional content.   

 

FOODS III – Juniors and Seniors – 1 cr.

Prerequisite: Completion of Foods II.

Purpose:
Students will build on skills developed in Foods I and Foods II courses to continue developing kitchen math and food chemistry skills.
 
Content:
This will include units on meat and poultry preparation, advanced baking and nutritional needs. 

 

FAMILY LIFE SKILLS- 9th-12th grade- .50 credit

Purpose:
Students will learn to make wise choices concerning relationships, mate selection, marriage, handling stress, future responsibilities and how to become contributing members of a global society.
 
Content:
Units will include positive self-image, dealing with peer pressure, developing important qualities such as trust, morals, work ethic and family concerns.  Students will examine past and present family functions and learn how to preserve the future of the family unit.  Family life cycles and the needs of families will be studied. 

 

BASIC BAKING- 9th-12th grade- .50 cr

The focus of the Basic Baking Course is to teach students the fundamental culinary baking skills needed to comprehend a written recipe and interpret the kitchen math while making connections to math and science topics outside of the classrooms.   Learning becomes fun as students are doing this while creating wonderful eatable treats and learning new skills and enforcing old skills.  Students will explore the new trends in baking while mastering the old baking skills of icing cakes, muffin making, cookie creations and baked yeast products.   At the completion of this course the students will have learned to create baked items that look and taste great.  Students with a prior knowledge of baking will be challenged to enhance their baking skills.

Major Text/Resources:  Food for Today and Living Now; text books and various cookbooks and educational web sites.

 

INTERNATIONAL FOODS A- 9th-12 grade- 1 credit

Prerequisite:  None

Purpose:
Students will study the food, culture and people from North America, South America, and Europe, develop skills to create International Cuisine dishes, study world food supply and the impact of it on our lives and study the culinary history of America.
 
Content:
Units will include meal planning from various countries, understanding how to prepare various famous dishes from their country of origin, understanding the global picture and the foods of the world.  Math, reading comprehension, map reading, history, and food science will all be addressed in this course. 

 

INTERNATIONAL FOODS B- 10th-12th grade – 1 credit

Prerequisite: None

Purpose:
Students will study the food, culture and people from Asia, Africa and Australia, prepare International dishes from these countries, study the world food supply and to look at new and various spices. 
 
Content:
Units will include meal planning from various countries, understanding how to prepare various famous dishes from their country of origin, understanding the global picture and the foods of the world.  Math, reading comprehension, map reading, history, and food science will all be addressed in this course. 

 

CHILD DEVELOPMENT- 9th-12th grade- .50 credit

Purpose: Students will learn about the developmental, health, safety and the best learning environments for young children. 

Content:
Units will include evaluating health and safety hazards relating to children at each stage of child development, analyzing plans and methods used to blend work and family responsibilities to meet the needs of children, examining the Child Development Theorists and understanding what their theories are and how this information is used today within various careers. 

 

GET THE FACTS-9th-12th grade- .50 credit

Purpose:
Students will examine how to balance family, work and community responsibilities, take a look at financial resource management and learn about personal nutrition over a life span.
 
Content:
Units will examine the effectiveness in the use of teamwork and leadership skills in accomplishing the work of the family and community responsibilities.  Examine the responsibilities associated with managing personal finances (e.g., savings, checking, credit, non-cash systems, investments, insurance), and analyze the energy requirements, nutrient requirements and body composition for individuals at various stages of the life cycle.   
 

 

 

MUSIC

 

CONCERT BAND- 7th-12th  - .50 cr.

Prerequisite: Adequate performance skills on a band instrument. Ability to participate in scheduled rehearsals and performances. Students already playing an instrument will be admitted. New students will be admitted on the basis of the ensemble’s instrumentation needs. Some school instruments are available, but most individuals supply their own instrument.

Purpose:
To enhance a student’s knowledge of music through study and performance of band literature.
 
Content:
Students are introduced to band music of various styles at a level of difficulty appropriate for their level of experience. Public performance opportunities exist for both marching and concert bands. Rehearsals are during activity periods and immediately after school  days each week. The fall concert which features holiday related music serves as the mid-term exam for the course. The spring concert serves as a final exam for the course. All performances follow the school activity guidelines. Chair seating is at the director’s discretion. Students also receive a graded individual/group lesson one period per 6 day cycle as a pull out on a rotating schedule. Lesson materials will include lesson books, solo literature, and ensemble music.

Performance Requirements: Students will be expected to participate in all scheduled activities including 6-8 parades per year and three major evening concerts as well as other events which may be scheduled.

 

MIXED ENSEMBLE10th- 12th grade – .50 cr.

Prerequisite: Must be a member of Concert Choir. Must have auditioned and been accepted into the group by the choral director in May of the previous year.

Purpose:
To provide additional and more intense vocal performance opportunities for students.
 
Content:
Expand on knowledge gained from Concert Choir. Upper level music is chosen for this group and they perform at numerous community and school functions. This course is offered as an after school elective course.

Performance Requirements: Students will be expected to participate in all scheduled activities including two major evening concerts and other school and community service events which may be scheduled.

 

CONCERT CHOIR-7th -12th grade - .33 cr.

Prerequisite: A desire to sing.

Purpose:
Provides an opportunity for students to experience and participate in musical performances.
 
Content:
This course is designed to develop the student’s knowledge of the elements and terminology of music and to acquire the vocal skills that are necessary to meet the standards of good singing. Music materials are varied and include popular, folk, patriotic, ethnic, and modern music. Rehearsals are during activity period.

Performance Requirements: Students will be expected to participate in all scheduled activities including two major evening concerts.

 

MUSIC ELECTIVE COURSE – Freshmen - Seniors - .17 – 1 cr.

Prerequisite: Prior approval by Mrs. DiLossi and Miss Welliver. Must be enrolled in either band and/or choral program.

Content:
Students in the course will have private lessons on either instrument and voice, will be developing their musical and technical skills through practice with the Smartmusic computer system, and will learn the theory behind the music they are performing. Each student will develop a practice plan based on his or her musical goals (i.e. County Chorus/band, district chorus/band preparation, drama and musical auditions, etc.). This course relies heavily on the students ability to work independently.

Grading: Grades will be a combination of music theory tests and lesson evaluations. Students will also be required to maintain a detailed practice journal and complete a final project. Most assignments and evaluation are done during class time.

 

PIANO CLASS- 9th – 12th grade-.50 credit

This class is designed for the beginning piano student who wishes to learn the fundamentals of playing the piano.  The student will learn a variety of songs using the Alfred 3-in-1 Piano Course.  Students with prior piano experience are also welcome in this class and will be given supplemental material relative to their playing skills/level.

 

GUITAR CLASS- 9th -12th grade- .50 credit

This course offers students an opportunity to learn the basic techniques and skills that may be applied to many styles of guitar music.  Material covered includes music reading, common guitar chords, care and tuning of the instrument and common strumming and picking styles.  You are NOT required to have your own guitar.  Guitarists of all levels and abilities are welcome.  Music instruction will be tailored to student’s individual needs. 

 

SO YOU THINK YOU CAN SING!- 9th -12th grade- .50 credit

Prerequisite: Must be a member of the High School Chorus

Have you always dreamed of auditioning for “American Idol” or singing center stage on Broadway?  If so, then this is the course for you.  This course is designed for students to gain an overview understanding about the art and science of singing, a basic knowledge about factors conditioning success, and proper attitude.  This course will include the study of many genres of music, understanding the connection between the anatomy of the voice and good tone production, and positive performance techniques. 

 

LIGHTS, CAMERA, ACTION! (AUDIO/VISUAL ENGINEERING)- 9th-12th grade- .50 cr

Prerequisite: None

There are 3 components to this course- audio engineering, lighting, and videography.  Students will learn about the basics of sound and acoustics, how to run a digital sound board, choose the right microphones for the right situation/productions, and use an ipad to remotely access and run the sound board.  Students will learn how to set stage lighting, create lighting effects and program light cues into the light board.  Students will also study the art of videography.  Students who take this course will gain a hands-on experience by running the sound and light board and video recording for various school events, including, but not limited to pep rallies, assemblies, and drama events.  Attendance at some out of school activities will be required.  

 

 

ART

 

2-D / 3-D DESIGN AND SCULPTURE I - 9th-12th grade- .50 credit

A course in drawing and design focusing on drawing techniques, methods, materials, conceptual development, and the use of the elements of design for creative expression.  This is an introductory drawing class focusing on perspective, contour drawing, pen and ink drawing, charcoal drawing, grid drawing, and classical drawing techniques. 

 

2-D / 3-D DESIGN AND SCULPTURE II - 10th-12th grade- .50 credit

A course in drawing and design focusing on drawing techniques, methods, materials, conceptual development, and the use of the elements of design for creative expression.  This is an intermediate level class that will focus on advanced perspective, contour drawing, pen and ink drawing, charcoal drawing, grid drawing, and classical drawing techniques.  This class will have weekly sketch assignments/homework, as well as, a writing assignment featuring a well-known artist.

 

PAINTING AND PRINTMAKING- 9th-12th grade- .50 credit

This is a course that will focus on painting and printmaking.  Some of the painting methods will include: watercolor painting, acrylic, and oil painting.  Printmaking methods explored will include: block printing, collographs, solar printing, and monoprints. 

 

PAINTING AND PRINTMAKING II- 10th-12th grade- .50 credit

This is a course that will focus on intermediate painting and printmaking techniques.  Some of the painting techniques could include large-scale watercolor, acrylic, and oil painting.  Printmaking techniques could include: large-scale block printing, collographs, solar printing, and monoprint series.  All students will be required to keep a notebook that will be turned in for a grade on a bi-weekly basis. 

 

CERAMICS, MOSAIC AND TEXTILE/FIBER ARTS- 9th-12th grade- .50 credit

A course in mosaic and textile arts focusing on ceramics, mosaic, and textile arts methods, materials, processes, procedures, conceptual development, and the use of the elements of design for creative expression.  Projects could include ceramics, mosaics, basket-making, and weaving on looms. 

 

CERAMICS, MOSAIC AND TEXTILE/FIBER ARTS II- 10th-12th grade- .50 credit

Mosaics and Textile/Fiber Arts

A course in mosaic, ceramics and textile arts, focusing on intermediate ceramics techniques, mosaics on a large scale using recycled materials, textile techniques for practical purposes, and the use of the elements and principles of design for creative expression.  All students will be required to keep an art notebook and should expect a minimum of one research-based project on traditional techniques and the history of one of these materials/art forms. 

 

DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY-9th-12th grade- .50 credit

***USB FLASH DRIVE REQUIRED.  Access to a digital camera (personal camera) preferred as classroom cameras will be limited.

This class will be an introduction to digital photography/digital SLR cameras, as well as, an introduction to the history of photography/photographic techniques.  The students will use photo-editing and manipulation techniques with such programs as Adobe Photoshop CS4, as well as, other web-based tools.  Projects could include:  montage/collage, photojournalism, retouching old photographs, light manipulation versus natural light with an emphasis on the elements and principals of design.

 

 

HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION,

DRIVERS EDUCATION

 

 

HEALTH Juniors - .50 cr.

Prerequisite: None

Purpose:
To promote acquisition of proper concepts in regard to personal, family, and community health.
 
Content:
This course is concerned with human life and health practices that have a positive and negative impact on one’s health. Mental health, human sexuality, tobacco, drugs and alcohol, nutrition, first aid and CPR, are the main units of information in which students will gain knowledge. Making healthy decisions with regards to these concepts of health is emphasized.

 

PHYSICAL EDUCATIONFreshmen - Seniors - .50 cr.

Prerequisite: None

Purpose:
To promote physical growth and development as well as the proper attitudes and skills to utilize a sound body effectively.
 
Content:
This course provides instruction in individual and team activities relative to sports. Individual and group games, drills, calisthenics, dance, and recreational activities are offered in addition to periodic fitness tests. The President’s Council of Physical Fitness test is administered each year in grades 7-12. An emphasis towards lifetime and recreational activities is directed towards 11th and 12th grade classes.

 

ADAPTIVE PHYSICAL EDUCATION - Special Scheduling determined by the IEP team

Prerequisite: Program prescribed by a physician upon request and approval of the parent and physical education instructor.

Purpose:
To provide a program of physical education for students who for medical reasons are unable to participate in a regular program.
 
Content:
This course emphasizes remedial activities approved by the family physician, physical therapist, and/or occupational therapist, under the supervision of the physical education instructor. Classes are very small, and sometimes instruction is individualized. Periodic theory tests may be administered.

 

OUTDOOR RECREATION - Juniors and Seniors - .50 cr.

Prerequisite: Passed 9th & 10th grade Phys. Ed. (class size is limited)                     

Purpose:
To introduce students to various outdoor activities where they will learn how to take advantage of the wide variety of recreational opportunities available in northern Columbia County.
 
Content:
The student may participate in activities such as: archery, orienteering, fishing, cross country skiing, golf, hiking, etc… they will learn safety measures, skill techniques, and participate in each of the activity units. Included with the course of study will be guest speakers to share their knowledge and expertise of outdoor education and recreational activities, outdoor recreation career search, and possible field trips. In class, students may also do snowshoe building, rod-building (fishing), cross country skiing, fly tying, and map making. 

 

FITNESS AND WELLNESS -  Juniors and Seniors - .50 cr.

Prerequisite: Passed 9th & 10th grade Phys. Ed. (class size is limited) Students must be passing their scheduled physical education class.

Purpose:
To introduce fitness and wellness as a lifetime commitment, recognizing the long term positive benefits.
 
Content:
Each student will develop an individual fitness program and set desirable fitness goals for the semester. Students will learn how to incorporate the different components of physical fitness and nutrition into their program. Students will be introduced to a variety of life-time activities and recognize that physical activity can be enjoyable and fun while benefiting their health. These activities may include hiking, cross country skiing, rollerblading or skating, golf, horseback riding, etc… Guest speakers may include a nutritionist, physician, and athletic trainer who will discuss how inactivity, obesity, poor nutrition and injury have an impact on health and overall wellness.

 

DRIVERS EDUCATIONSophomores - .50 cr.

Prerequisite: None

Purpose:
This course will inform young drivers of the rules and regulations of driving. It will help them to develop good safety habits when driving a motor vehicle, become more aware of the vehicle needs and responses that are encountered when driving, and take proper care of a vehicle.
 
Content:
Through the use of videos, handouts, and various examples, the young drivers and soon to be drivers will be introduced to the methods of safe driving and proper vehicle maintenance to be able to drive within the requirements of the law and common sense driving habits.
 

 

TECHNICAL EDUCATION

 

MANUFACTURING I  - 9th-12th grade - 1 cr.

Prerequisite: Completion of Basic Industrial Drafting.

Content:
This course is a systematic study of common manufacturing and safety procedures. In this course students will develop an understanding of manufacturing production safety and time management. In this course each student will build a shelf, table, and clock. Turning fundamentals will also be obtained using the lathe. There will be a $14.00 charge for dial boards.

 

MANUFACTURING II–  10th-12th grade - 1 cr.

Prerequisite: Completion of Manufacturing I

Content:
This course will allow students to build a kayak and an etched glass coffee table using the manufacturing process which includes drafting and CAD.  Students will work together and problem solve to design a kayak and then test in Fishing Creek when prototype is in working order. 

 

ENERGY, POWER AND TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS- 9th-12th grade- .50 credit

In this course students will learn about principals of radiant and potential energy, electrical, fluid and mechanical power and land, air, space and sea transportation.  You will also learn about propulsion methods and environmental concerns.  Each student will build a robot arm using fluid power energy.  There will also be an opportunity to build a mouse trap car.  Students may also design and build a game using series and parallel circuitry. 
 
 
WOOD ART- 9th-12th grade- .50 credit

Students will learn different techniques to make art out of wood.  Students will learn how to carve, sculpt, apply a faux antique look to their art.  This is a projects based class.

 

BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY-9th-12th grade- .50 credits

This class will teach students about business, marketing, design, and manufacturing.  Students will sell products on Ebay, Etsy, or Craiglist.  A business plan will be designed according to the systems model and students will run their own business.  Students will build and sell their product for a profit or loss.  Projects will not necessarily be made out of wood.  Students will keep 60% of profit and 40% will go to the Tech Ed program.  

 

 

VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE

 

NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT- 9th-12th grade- .50 credit

This course is designed to make students more aware of the needs for conservation of our natural resources.  Topics to be covered include energy, growth and regulating populations, water pollution, air pollution, land pollution, land and water use, and agriculture. 

 

WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT- 9th-12th grade- .50 credit

This course is designed to make students more aware of the latest concepts in fish and wildlife management.  Topics to be covered include zoology, ecology, mammals, birds, fish, conservation, and management. 

 

AGRICULTURE SCIENCE-9th-12th grade- .50 credit

This course is designed to make students more aware of latest concepts in agricultural science.  Topics to be covered include FFA, history of agriculture, agriculture today, and agricultural careers. 

 

ANIMAL SCIENCE-9th-12th grade- .50 credit

This course is designed to make students more aware of the latest concepts in animal science.  Topics to be covered include animal classification, animal species, animal behavior, consumer concerns, animal welfare, growth and development, nutrition, parasites and disease. 

 

HORTICULTURE-9th-12th grade- .50 credit

This course is designed to make students more aware of the latest concepts in horticulture.  Topics to be covered include plant science, plant propagation, greenhouse management, pest management, landscaping, and vegetable and small fruit gardening. 

 

FORESTRY-9th-12th grade- .50 credit

This course is designed to make students more aware of the latest concepts in forestry science.  Topics to be covered include forest regions, tree species, forest management, dendrology, forest technologies, and forest products. 

 

AGRIBUSINESS- 9th-12th grade- .50 credit

This course is designed to introduce students to agricultural business and entrepreneurship.  Subject areas covered will include; record keeping, entrepreneurship, and both national and international agricultural trade. 

 

AGRICULTURAL INDEPENDENT STUDY  - Sophomores - Seniors (credit will vary)

Prerequisite: All independent study students must also be active Future Farmers of America members.

Purpose:
To allow those students interested in pursuing a study of agricultural but who are unable to schedule a regular agriculture class to pursue their agricultural goals.  This course is also applicable to those agriculture students who have chosen an approved Supervised Agricultural Experience.
 
Content:
The student will select and develop an approved supervised agricultural and keep track of their experience using an approved record keeping system.  This course will consist of a minimum of 135 hours.  The instructor will visit the student’s project and help the student to evaluate the project.

 

AGRICULTURAL SHOP/BUILDING TRADES – 9th-12th grade-.50 credit

Prerequisite: None

Purpose:
Introduction to job requirements along with hands-on machinery usage.
 
Content:
Using tools and equipment available.  The students will work with wood, demonstrating some common methods of the construction trades.  Design and problem solving techniques will be stressed.

 

AGRICULTURAL SHOP/BUILDING TRADES II – 9th-12th grade- .50 credit

Prerequisite: Agricultural Shop/Building Trades I

Content:
This course will build on those skills learned in Agricultural Shop/Building Trades I.  Students will be expected to learn and demonstrate the ability to plan a project and work independently. 

 

CO-OP AG- Seniors - 1 cr.

Prerequisite: None

Purpose:
To help students better understand how to look for and apply for a job of their choosing.
 
Content:
This course will use methods such as application work, job selection criteria and field trips to better learn how to go about selecting a job, getting that job, and keeping a job once attained. All agricultural students will be required to select and implement a Supervised Agricultural Experience Program (an AG project). This project will entail a minimum of 100 hours of out of school time. The students must keep records of their project. The Agriculture instructor will make project visits to evaluate the project and assist the student. The project and the records of the project will figure prominently in the student’s grade (approximately 30%).

All agriculture students are encouraged to join FFA.

 

SAE (SUPERVISED AGRICULTURAL EXPERIENCE) I-IV- 1 credit

SAE involves the students in the actual operation of raising, managing or working within the selected field of work.  Students involved in SAE will have the options of Work Experience, Cooperative Work Studies, Entrepreneurship, Conservation Studies, Home Improvement, Practicum Skill or Research Studies.  Both the students and their programs will have direct involvement within both the local, state and national areas.

 

 

INDEPENDENT STUDY CRITERIA

Prior to approval for Independent Study, students must meet the following criteria:

  1. The student must have an 85 average or better and have not failed any courses.
  2. The student may not take a course they previously failed or take a course offered in the regular core curriculum that can be placed in their schedule.
  3. The student must submit a written request to the guidance office with justification for taking the course.
  4. Independent study requests must have the approval of the guidance counselor and teacher prior to submission to the principal for final approval.
  5. Independent study for gifted students should be included in the gifted IEP.
  6. Students may not be taken out of a core class (English, Math, Social Studies, Science) for an independent study course.
  7. Specific class requirements and syllabus for the independent study will be developed by the teacher and approved prior to the student beginning the independent study.
  8. Students who fail to fulfill the requirements as agreed upon for the course will be removed from the independent study and scheduled into an available class.
  9. Independent study must be requested and approved prior to the beginning of classes for a full credit course.
  10. Criteria for independent study will be included in the course selection guide.
Website by SchoolMessenger Presence. © 2017 West Corporation. All rights reserved.